The Alternative English Dictionary: angle

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Entry definition

angle pronunciation
  • /ˈæŋ.ɡəl/
  • (also) (US) /ˈeɪŋ.ɡəl/
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etymology 1 From Middle English, from Middle French angle, from Latin angulus, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂engulos 〈*h₂engulos〉 < *ang-. Cognate with Old High German ancha, Middle High German anke.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. {{senseid}}(geometry) A figure formed by two ray which start from a common point (a plane angle) or by three plane that intersect (a solid angle). examplethe angle between lines A and B
  2. {{senseid}}(geometry) The measure of such a figure. In the case of a plane angle, this is the ratio (or proportional to the ratio) of the arc length to the radius of a section of a circle cut by the two rays, centered at their common point. In the case of a solid angle, this is the ratio of the surface area to the square of the radius of the section of a sphere. exampleThe angle between lines A and B is π/4 radians, or 45 degrees.
  3. A corner where two walls intersect. examplean angle of a building
  4. A change in direction.
    • {{quote-magazine}}
    exampleThe horse took off at an angle.
  5. {{senseid}} A viewpoint; a way of looking at something.
    • {{quote-magazine}}
    • 2005, Adams Media, Adams Job Interview Almanac (page 299) For example, if I was trying to repitch an idea to a producer who had already turned it down, I would say something like, "I remember you said you didn't like my idea because there was no women's angle. Well, here's a great one that both of us must have missed during our first conversation."
  6. (media) The focus of a news story.
  7. (slang, professional wrestling) A storyline between two wrestlers, providing the background for and approach to a feud.
  8. (slang) A scheme; a means of benefitting from a situation, usually hidden, possibly illegal. exampleHis angle is that he gets a percentage, but mostly in trade.
  9. A projecting or sharp corner; an angular fragment.
    • Dryden though but an angle reached him of the stone
  10. (astrology) Any of the four cardinal points of an astrological chart: the Ascendant, the Midheaven, the Descendant and the Imum Coeli.
Synonyms: (corner) corner, (change in direction) swerve, (vertex) -gon (as per hexagon), (viewpoint) opinion, perspective, point of view, slant, view, viewpoint
hyponyms: {{hyp-top4}}
  • acute angle
  • angle of repose
  • central angle
  • complementary angle
{{hyp-mid4}}
  • dihedral angle
  • exterior angle
  • interior angle
  • oblique angle
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  • opposite angle
  • plane angle
  • right angle
  • round angle
{{hyp-mid4}}
  • solid angle
  • straight angle
  • supplementary angle
  • vertical angle
{{hyp-bottom}}
related terms: {{rel-top}}
  • angle bracket
  • angle quote
{{rel-mid}}
  • play the angles
{{rel-bottom}}
related terms:
  • angular
  • angulate
  • angulation
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (transitive, often in the passive) To place (something) at an angle. The roof is angled at 15 degrees.
  2. (intransitive, informal) To change direction rapidly. The five ball angled off the nine ball but failed to reach the pocket.
  3. (transitive, informal) To present or argue something in a particular way or from a particular viewpoint. How do you want to angle this when we talk to the client?
  4. (snooker) To leave the cue ball in the jaws of a pocket such that the surround of the pocket (the "angle") blocks the path from cue ball to object ball.
etymology 2 From Middle English anglelen, from angel, from Old English angel, angul, from Proto-Germanic *angulō, *angô, from Proto-Indo-European *ank-, *Hank-. Cognate with Western Frisian angel, Dutch angel, Icelandic öngull, German Angel, German angeln.
verb: {{en-verb}}
  1. (intransitive) To try to catch fish with a hook and line.
  2. (informal) (with for) To attempt to subtly persuade someone to offer a desired thing. He must be angling for a pay rise.
noun: {{en-noun}}
  1. A fishhook; tackle for catching fish, consisting of a line, hook, and bait, with or without a rod.
    • Shakespeare Give me mine angle: we'll to the river there.
    • Alexander Pope A fisher next his trembling angle bears.
anagrams:
  • angel, Angel, Elgan, Galen, glean

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