The Alternative French Dictionary

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Colourful extracts from Wiktionary. Slang, vulgarities, profanities, slurs, interjections, colloquialisms and more.

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adverb: {{head}}
  1. (text messaging, slang) more
06 pronunciation
  • /ze.ʁo sis/
etymology From the fact that all mobile phone numbers start "06" in France.
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) mobile phone number
  • C'est quoi ton 06 ? - What's your number?
a
etymology 1
letter: {{fr-letter}}
  1. The first letter of the French alphabet, written in the Latin script.
{{attention}}
etymology 2 Quebec eye-dialect spelling of elle. pronunciation
  • /a/
pronoun: {{fr-pron}}
  1. (Quebec, colloquial) alternative form of elle {{rfex}}
etymology 3
symbol: {{head}}
  1. are 100 square metres
etymology 4
verb: {{fr-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of avoir exampleElle a un chat. She has a cat.
abajoue pronunciation
  • /abaʒu/
etymology Probably by reanalysis of la bajoue.
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (anatomy, zoology) A pouch in the cheek of some animals, usually used to carry food; a cheek pouch.
  2. (slang) A flabby face or cheek.
  • Not to be confused with bajoue, which is the name of the cheeks of some animals.
abattis etymology From abattre + is. pronunciation
  • /a.ba.ti/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. rubble
  2. (Canada) An area that has been clear of tree, but not yet of their stump.
  3. (cooking, plurale tantum) giblet
  4. (military) abatis
  5. (dated, slang, plurale tantum) limb
verb: {{fr-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of abattre
  2. inflection of abattre
anagrams:
  • battais
abouler
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (dialectal, intransitive) To roll along a surface.
  2. (Europe, dated slang, transitive) To hand over or give money or goods; to pay.
  3. (Europe, dated slang, intransitive or pronominal) To rush or hurry over.
anagrams:
  • laboure, labouré
aboyer etymology From Old French abayer, abaüer, probably of onomatopoetic origin. Compare Latin baubari, Italian abbaiare. pronunciation
  • [abwaje]
  • {{audio}}
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (intransitive, of a dog) to bark
  2. (intransitive) to scream at or inveigh against somebody
  3. (transitive, usually, pejorative) to scream or yell in short bouts; to bark exampleIl aboie des ordres sans s'arrêter pour respirer
  • To mark the target of the barking, the usual preposition is après; less common is contre, while à is dated.
abruti
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. Whose physical or mental capacities have been impair by tiredness or another factor; dazed. Des vainqueurs abrutis de crime, ivres d'encens — Victor Hugo Pourquoi plus de la moitié des hommes est-elle abrutie par les superstitions ? — Diderot & D'Alembert
  2. (chiefly, Europe, informal) Moronic, idiotic.
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (chiefly, Europe, informal) moron, idiot, fool
In Canada, terms like newfie and innocent are preferred.
verb: {{fr-past participle}}
  1. past participle of abrutir
anagrams:
  • bruita
abscons
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (literary, pejorative) So abstruse as to prevent comprehension entirely.
abstrus etymology From {{etym}} abstrusus, perfect passive participle of abstrudo pronunciation
  • [ap.stʁy]
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (literary, pejorative) abstruse
Synonyms: abscons
accoter
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (reflexive) to lean
  2. (transitive) to support, to rest (on)
  3. (Québec, informal) to equal
accoutrement etymology From accoutrer + ment. pronunciation
  • /akutʁəmɑ̃/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (obsolete) (elaborate) outfit
  2. (colloquial, pejorative) getup
accro etymology Apocopic form of accroché or accroché, past participle of accrocher. pronunciation
  • /a.kʁo/
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (slang) hooked: addicted, unable to resist
    • 1998, , Coucher Avec Toi, in “Paris” Je suis accro / À l’érotisme, / À la musique, / Cigarettes, / Whisky, / Dessiner / Et coucher avec toi
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (slang) addict
acide etymology Latin acidus, from aceō. pronunciation
  • /a.sid/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{homophones}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. acid, acidic, sour, tart
  2. (chemistry) acid, acidic
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (chemistry) acid
  2. (slang) LSD acid
anagrams:
  • cédai
actu etymology Apocopic form of actualité. pronunciation
  • /ak.ty/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) news
adja etymology From Romany dja, imperative form of natchar, from Sanskrit नाशति 〈nāśati〉. pronunciation
  • /adʒa/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (slang) A word used only in certain set phrases (see below).
ado etymology Apocopic form of adolescent. pronunciation
  • /a.do/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) teen, teenager
adulescent pronunciation
  • /a.dy.lɛ.sɑ̃/
etymology {{blend}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) a kidult
affaire etymology a + faire pronunciation
  • /a.fɛʁ/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{rhymes}}
  • {{homophones}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. affair, business
  2. deal
  3. (Quebec, informal) things; stuff
    • 1996, Chrystine Brouillet, C'est pour mieux t'aimer, mon enfant, 2-89021-276-9, 66, "Cibole! C'est pas le genre d'affaire qu'on oublie!" — Dangit! It's not the kind of stuff you just forget!
  4. (Quebec, informal) thingamajig
  • In the meaning of "thing, stuff", the word is also used as a plurale tantum.
related terms:
  • faire
  • affairement
  • affairer
affoler
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (transitive) to madden, drive crazy (under the effects of a strong emotion)
  2. (transitive) to terrify, frighten, scare
  3. (intransitive) to run like crazy, leg it
  4. (reflexive) to go crazy, go bonkers
  5. (reflexive, informal) to hurry up, to make haste
affûter Alternative forms: affuter (1990 reform spelling) etymology {{confix}}
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. to sharpen; to whet (e.g. a tool)
  2. (reflexive) to wet one's whistle
  3. (slang, rare) to eat
  4. (slang, rare) to dance
related terms:
  • fût
  • affûtiau
agglo
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) conglomerate (in building trade)
Synonyms: aggloméré
agissement pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (pejorative, usually in plural) doing, intrigue, scheme
agonir
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (slang) to throw (insults at), to spit (profanities at)
aïoli etymology From Occitan alhòli, contraction of alh and òli pronunciation
  • /ajɔli/
  • (Provence) /aˈjɔli/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. aioli
interjection: {{head}}
  1. (Marseille slang) yo; respect
airbag etymology Borrowing from English airbag.
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. airbag
  2. (in the plural, slang) knockers, tits
à l'arrache
adverb: {{fr-adv}}
  1. (colloquial) hastily; in a hurry J'en ai fait encore une à l'arrache. I dashed off another one / I churned out another one.
à la cantonade
adverb: {{head}}
  1. (colloquial) to no one in particular
alcoolo pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (informal, pejorative) alcoholic (person)
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal, pejorative) alcoholic (person)
related terms:
  • alcoolique
aller se faire voir
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to get lost, go to hell exampleVa te faire voir! Get lost!
allez voir là-bas si j'y suis
phrase: {{head}}
  1. (idiomatic, colloquial, dismissal) get lost! go away
allons-y pronunciation
  • /a.lɔ̃.zi/
phrase: {{fr-phrase}}
  1. (informal, first person plural, imperative) let's go
  2. (informal, first person plural, imperative) let's go there
  3. (informal, imperative) come with me, follow me
related terms:
  • vas-y (second person singular)
  • allez-y (second person plural or formal)
alp
abbreviation: {{rfc-header}} {{head}}
  1. (Internet slang, texting) à la prochaine
alu
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) Short for aluminium.
amateurisme etymology From amateur + isme
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. amateurism
  2. (pejorative) amateurishness
amerloque
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal, sometimes, pejorative) Yank, Yankee
àmha etymology From à mon humble avis. Probably a calque of English in my humble opinion.
adverb: {{fr-adv}}
  1. (informal, Internet slang, initialism) IMHO
amocher etymology From {{confix}}. pronunciation
  • /a.mɔ.ʃe/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (transitive, colloquial) to mess up
amphi etymology Apocopic form of amphithéâtre. pronunciation
  • /ɑ̃.fi/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) lecture theatre
amplificateur pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. amplifier
related terms:
  • amplifier
Synonyms: ampli informal
andouille etymology {{rfe}} pronunciation
  • /ɑ̃.duj/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. andouille
  2. (slang) imbecile, numpty, fool
descendants:
  • English: andouille
  • Sicilian: 'nduja
  • Turkish: andaval, andavallı
ânerie etymology From âne + erie
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) a piece of bullshit something stupid or ridiculous
Synonyms: connerie, bêtise
anagrams:
  • aérien, ânière, enraie
anglaiser
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. castrate
  2. (slang, vulgar) bugger, sodomize, rape anally
anagrams:
  • aligneras, glanerais, sanglerai, signalera
Angliche etymology Deliberately humorous spelling of English. pronunciation
  • /ɑ̃.ɡliʃ/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial, pejorative, usually plural) Englishman/Englishwoman
Synonyms: Anglais, Anglaise
angliche etymology Deliberately humorous spelling of English. pronunciation
  • /ɑ̃.ɡliʃ/
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (colloquial, pejorative) pom, limey, English
Synonyms: anglais
aoûtien Alternative forms: aoutien (post-1990) etymology août + ien
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) someone who goes on holiday in August
anagrams:
  • énouait
apéritif etymology From Latin apertivus, from aperir + -ivus. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. apéritif
Synonyms: apéro (informal)
antonyms:
  • digestif
anagrams:
  • pétrifia
à plus tard
interjection: {{fr-intj}}
  1. see you later
Synonyms: (colloquial) à plus
à poil pronunciation
  • /a pwal/
  • {{audio}}
adjective: {{head}}
  1. (colloquial) in the buff, stark naked Une fille à poil - a naked girl Se promener à poil - to walk around naked
appellation contrôlée
noun: {{head}}
  1. (informal) A synonym of the official term “appellation d’origine contrôlée”.
arabe du coin
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (derogatory) Paki shop
archibondé etymology From archi + bondé
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (informal) packed, chock-a-block
Synonyms: archiplein
argousin etymology From Italian aguzzino, auzzino, from Neapolitan algozino and Sicilian algozino, from Catalan algutzir. pronunciation
  • /aʁɡuzɛ̃/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (archaic, slang) rozzer, copper
anagrams:
  • arguions
arnaque etymology From arnaquer. pronunciation
  • /aʁnak/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) con, rip-off
arrangé etymology The adjective follows from the verb.
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. (informal, of a person or thing) Organized, neat.
verb: {{fr-past participle}}
  1. past participle of arranger
anagrams:
  • rangera
arranger pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • /a.ʁɔ̃.ʒe/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. to arrange
  2. (colloquial) to suit, to be convenient
    • Désolé, ça ne m'arrange pas Sorry, that doesn't work for me.
  3. (reflexive) To be set for
    • 1829, Victor Hugo, Le Dernier Jour d’un condamné Depuis l’heure où mon arrêt m’a été prononcé, combien sont morts qui s’arrangeaient pour une longue vie ! Ever since my sentence was passed, how many who were set for a long life have died!
descendants:
  • German: arrangieren
arriéré pronunciation
  • aʁjeʁe
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. late (for work or debt)
  2. (derogatory) backwards behind current trends
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. arrear
arsouille pronunciation
  • /aʁ.suj/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (dated, colloquial) ruffian
asperge etymology From Latin asparagus, from Ancient Greek ἀσπάραγος 〈aspáragos〉. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • /as.pɛʁʒ/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. asparagus (plant, vegetable)
  2. (informal) A tall, thin person; a beanpole.
    • 1926, Marcel Aymé, Brûlebois, Éditions Gallimard, chap. II, 1975 ed., p. 25 — Tiens, disait-il à Charles, entre le rôti et la salade, ne me parle pas de tes asperges d'aujourd'hui, ça n'a ni cul, ni corsage. Quand j'étais jeune homme, ah! oui, il y avait du plaisir. Tu pouvais mettre les mains, tu tenais quelque chose.
anagrams:
  • présage
aspi pronunciation
  • /as.pi/
etymology 1 Apocopic form of aspirant
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) young military officer
etymology 2 Apocopic form of aspirateur
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) vacuum cleaner; hoover
anagrams:
  • pais
assistanat
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. assistantship
  2. (pejorative) charity, welfare
astiquer etymology astic + er pronunciation
  • /as.ti.ke/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (transitive) to polish, shine, rub, furbish
  2. (reflexive, slang) to wank
    • Je crois qu'il est en train de s'astiquer le poireau.
attacher sa tuque
verb: {{fr-verb}} (literally, "tie your tuque [on]")
  1. (Quebec, informal, idiomatic) To brace oneself; to get ready. Du côté du bureau d'information touristique à Magog, on m'a dit qu'il faudra attacher nos tuques. - I was told by the Magog tourism office that we'd better be ready. Attachez vos tuques, vous n'avez pas fini de vous désoler. - Brace yourself, it's far from being over.
  • The possessive determiner agrees with the subject. If the subject is plural, also is.
attacher sa tuque avec de la broche
verb: {{fr-verb}} (literally, "tie your tuque [on] with metal wire")
  1. (Quebec, informal, idiomatic) form of Emphatic form Tu es mieux d'attacher ta tuque avec de la broche une fois rendue à Montréal, parce que c'est extrêmement rare que les gens vont te regarder quand tu marches dans la rue, encore moins te sourire. - You better be ready when you arrive in Montreal, because it's exceptional people look at you in the street, much less smile for you.
  • The possessive determiner agrees with the subject. If the subject is plural, also is.
attifer etymology From Old French atifer. pronunciation
  • /a.ti.fe/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (transitive, informal) to deck out
auberge pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • /o.bɛʁʒ/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. hostel
  2. (slang) prison
au pif etymology au + pif, literally, "by the nose". pronunciation
  • /o pif/
adverb: {{fr-adv}}
  1. (colloquial) approximately, roughly.
Synonyms: au pifomètre, à la louche, à vue de nez, au doigt mouillé, au feeling, au jugé
au revoir etymology au + revoir, literally "until the reseeing". pronunciation
  • /o.ʁə.vwaʁ/ or /ɔʁ.vwaʁ/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{audio}}
interjection: {{fr-intj}}
  1. goodbye
Synonyms: (informal) salut, à plus tard, à plus
anagrams:
  • ouvrerai
aussi sec
adverb: {{head}}
  1. (colloquial) at once, right away.
    • 1981, Jean-Marc Ligny, Furia!, ISBN 2-207-30346-2 Il se dit qu'il ne ressortira plus jamais de cette cour des miracles, que dans dix minutes un petit nerveux va déboucher d'une venelle avec un couteau et le planter aussi sec.
automobile etymology auto + mobile, as the vehicle is powered by an engine rather than pulled by horses. pronunciation
  • /ɔ.tɔ.mɔ.bil/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{homophones}}
  • {{hyphenation}}
adjective: {{fr-adj}}
  1. automotive
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. automobile exampleL’automobile est un moyen de déplacement pratique à la campagne, mais cher et polluant. The automobile is a practical means of travel in the countryside, but it's expensive and polluting.
Synonyms: (informal) auto, (France, informal) bagnole, (France, informal) caisse, (Quebec) char, (France, informal) tire, voiture
descendants:
  • German: Automobil
  • Russian: автомоби́ль 〈avtomobílʹ〉
au violon
adverb: {{fr-adv}}
  1. (dated, slang) In the clink; imprisoned.
This idiom is quite oldfashioned, nowadays "en taule" is rather used.
avec pas de
preposition: {{fr-prep}}
  1. (Quebec, informal) without
    • {{quote-news}}
avoine etymology From Old French aveine, from Latin avēna. pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • /a.vwan/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. oat
  2. (slang) punch (a hit with the fist)
related terms:
  • avoinée
avoinée etymology From avoine
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (informal) reprimand, reproach
related terms:
  • avoine
avoir bon
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (slang) to be very happy; to be stoked, psyched Je suis tombé sur la partie que j'avais le mieux étudié, j'avais bon ! The bit that came up was the bit I'd studied, I was well happy!
avoir de la conversation
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) To talk easily, always having something to say.
  2. (dated) To be stacked, have big breasts.
avoir du mal
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (informal) to have a hard time, to have difficulty
avoir du monde au balcon etymology Literally "to have people at the balcony".
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (idiomatic, colloquial) to be stacked, to have big breasts
avoir du pain sur la planche
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to have one's work cut out
avoir hâte
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) can't wait J'ai trop hâte de la revoir. I can't wait to see her again.
avoir la dent
verb: {{head}}
  1. (colloquial) to be starving
avoir la pelote à terre
phrase: {{head}}
  1. (Quebec, slang, vulgar) To be very tired
avoir le cœur sur la main
verb: {{fr-verb}} ("have the heart on the hand")
  1. (idiomatic, slang) to be open-handed, to be generous exampleMagali a le cœur sur la main. Magali is generous.
Synonyms: être généreux
avoir le motton
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (Quebec) to be on the verge of tear
avoir les crocs
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (slang) to be hungry
avoir une araignée au plafond etymology Literally "to have a spider on the ceiling"
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (idiomatic) (colloquial) to have bats in one's belfry
avoir un grain etymology Possibly related to the nautical sense of grain, an abnormal meteorological phenomenon.
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (informal) to be crazy, to be strangely behaved
babaille etymology From English bye-bye. pronunciation {{rfp}}
interjection: {{head}}
  1. (colloquial, Quebec) bye-bye
Synonyms: au revoir
babine etymology Imitative. pronunciation
  • /babin/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. prominent or pendulous animal lip (of camel, monkey etc.)
  2. (colloquial) (human) lip
baccalauréat etymology Mediaeval Latin baccalaureatus, from baccalaureus, an alteration of baccalarius ‘young man aspiring to knighthood’ to resemble bacca lauri ‘laurel berry’ (the ancient symbol of victory). pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • /bakalɔʁea/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. baccalaureat (≈ A-level, high school diploma)
  2. (Canada) bachelor's degree
Synonyms: bac (colloquial), bachot (colloquial)
bachot etymology bachelier + ot; various variants existed but are no longer used: bachau, bacho... pronunciation
  • {{hyphenation}}
  • /baʃo/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) baccalauréat; bac (≈ A-level, high school diploma) exampleavoir son bachot.
bachoter etymology bachot + er pronunciation
  • /ba.ʃɔ.te/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to cram revise hard for an exam, especially for a baccalauréat exam
bader etymology Borrowing from English bad + er pronunciation
  • /ba.de/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial, mostly used by adolescents) to be sad, to be depressive
baffe pronunciation
  • /baf/
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial) smack; hit on the head
verb: {{fr-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of baffer
  2. inflection of baffer
  3. inflection of baffer
  4. inflection of baffer
  5. inflection of baffer
baffer etymology From baffe + er pronunciation
  • /ba.fe/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to hit (on the face)
bafouille
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (slang) letter (written message)
verb: {{fr-verb-form}}
  1. inflection of bafouiller
  2. inflection of bafouiller
  3. inflection of bafouiller
  4. inflection of bafouiller
  5. inflection of bafouiller
bâfrer etymology Originally onomatopoeic. pronunciation
  • /bɑ.fʁe/
verb: {{fr-verb}}
  1. (colloquial) to guzzle, gobble; to binge
bagnole etymology From Occitan pronunciation
  • {{audio}}
  • /baɲɔl/
  • {{hyphenation}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. (colloquial); ride; wheels an automobile
bahut etymology Origin uncertain. pronunciation
  • /bay/
  • {{audio}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. chest; sideboard
  2. (school slang) school
  3. (colloquial) lorry, truck; (taxi) cab
bail etymology From bailler. pronunciation
  • /baj/
  • {{audio}}
  • {{homophones}}
noun: {{fr-noun}}
  1. lease
  2. (colloquial) yonks, ages
    • 2004, David Foenkinos, Le potentiel érotique de ma femme: Il disait que ça faisait un bail qu'ils ne s'étaient pas vus, qu'il lui manquait […]. He was saying that it had been ages since they'd seen each other, and that he missed him.
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